[ Content | Sidebar ]

A Chaotically Mended and Stitched Furoshiki: Unusual Patterns

Written on May 16, 2014

SashikoBoroFursohiki3This eccentric beauty is a recent acquisition from my recent buying trip to Japan.  I couldn’t resist it, and you probably can see why, even with a quick glance.

SashikoBoroFursohiki3aIt is a sashiko stitched furoshiki which is mended in a marvelously complex way, and it is also “over stitched” in a similarly marvelous way.

SashikoBoroFursohiki3bBy “over stitched” I mean that it appears that in its original form, the furoshiki may have just been stitched with corner reinforcements and kanji, or Chinese characters.  Then, it seems, irregularly stacked columns of sashiko stitching were added on top of the original stitching, presumably for reinforcement.  By looking at the last picture on this posting, below, you may see what I mean by this description.

SashikoBoroFursohiki3cIt is also curious to consider the patches on the back of this furoshiki, shown above and below.  Note that some of them have been sashiko stitched, maybe taken from another stitched textile–or maybe not.  In any case, this multi-directional, randomly placed stitching over stitching lends a beautifully complex effect to the overall piece.

SashikoBoroFursohiki3d

SashikoBoroFursohiki3e

SashikoBoroFursohiki3fNotice the stitching patterns on the front of the furoshiki, shown in the photo above: quite unusual, aren’t they?  This piece measures 38″ x 36″ or 96.5 cm x 91.5 cm and it probably dates to the early 20th century.

.

5 Comments

Comments closed

  1. Comment by helen cox:

    really,really,wonderful

    May 16, 2014 @ 1:35 pm

  2. Comment by Stephen:

    Thank you!

    May 16, 2014 @ 1:36 pm

  3. Comment by Tomomi McElwee:

    Very interesing fuoshiki piece. Those letters are “six” and “pond” and your photos show reverse image. May I see the other side for the matter of interest, please.

    May 16, 2014 @ 6:46 pm

  4. Comment by Stephen:

    For Tomomi McElwee, thank you for your comment. Both sides of the furoshiki are shown above.

    May 16, 2014 @ 6:48 pm

  5. Comment by Claudia Fisk:

    What a treasure.Thank you for such beautiful images, as always.
    Such interesting mending and layering.

    May 22, 2014 @ 4:09 am