[ Content | Sidebar ]

A Sashiko Stitched Vest from Tohoku

Written on May 7, 2011

This sleeveless garment–referred to as sodenashi or dogi–is from Aomori Prefecture in the far northeastern region of Honshu, which is a remote and rural area.
It is made of repurposed cotton katazome cloth which has been heavily sashiko stitched, the stitching creating a blurred effect to the figured, resist dyed base cloth.Although Aomori Prefecture is very rural, it is this region which produced some of Japan’s most intricately sashiko stitched textiles, such as kogin, the famous stitching from Aomori’s Tsugaru region, which is the origin of this garment. Aomori can receive a great deal of snow in winter and some historians have conjectured that the heavy, white sashiko stitching of this area is a visual allusion to snowfall.This particular vest is made of repurposed parts as can be seen in the the photo above, and below: sometimes the body of  such vests from Aomori are sewn from one type of figured cloth, not of  two as is the case here.Amazingly tight stitching.Notice that the collar and the side panels are sewn from kasuri or ikat cloth–the inclusion of kasuri cloth on these sodenashi is typical of this form of garment.This kind of vest is said to come from Hirosaki in the Tsugaru region of Aomori. It dates to the late nineteenth, early twentieth century.This kind of vest could have been worn layered over a coat, or directly over an undergarment.  See a similar example in Beyond the Tanabata Bridge: Traditional Japanese Textiles, pp. 113-114.

Tagged: , , .

3 Comments

Comments closed

  1. Comment by Aase G:

    A beauty. Truly inspirational.

    May 8, 2011 @ 3:08 pm

  2. Comment by paula:

    stunning.
    “some historians have conjectured that the heavy, white sashiko stitching of this area is a visual allusion to snowfall.” <3 that!

    May 8, 2011 @ 4:25 pm

  3. Pingback from sashiko « anne louise likes:

    […] sri threads […]

    July 27, 2011 @ 9:05 pm